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Schumer visits SUNY Adirondack touting importance of cyber-security education

February 19, 2018 07:02 PM

QUEENSBURY - It's the danger lurking beyond your computer or smartphone.

People -- or even representatives of countries, trying to hack into or steal your information.

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There are companies out there who protect us from cyberattacks, but Jared Humiston, president of ADK Techs, a cybersecurity firm in Argyle, says they have a difficult time finding qualified employees.

"It's getting increasingly harder," Humiston said. "This is a very competitive field."

Enter SUNY Adirondack and its new cybersecurity degree program. They're training local people today how to stop tomorrow's hackers.

This is the first year SUNY Adirondack has offered cybersecurity classes. They've been so popular, they've had to add more. They offer three classes now, and will offer five or six next year. Students learn how to stop hackers before they steal information from individuals, businesses and the government.

"I'd love to see it as a national model that we can spread throughout the country, because the need for cybersecurity is not just in Washington and Warren and Saratoga counties, it's throughout America," said U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer during a visit to the campus Monday afternoon.

Schumer, the senior senator from New York and the minority leader of the Senate, says rarely has a college program been more relevant. Just last week, the U.S. indicted 13 Russians for cyber-meddling in the presidential election.

The two-year I.T. Cybersecurity program offers an Associate's Degree and the chance to continue on at other SUNY schools to get a Bachelor's Degree and earn an average of $92,000 a year.

Schumer says nationwide, the program needs hundreds of millions of dollars to meet the country's needs, and he plans to get started finding funding right away.

Tech companies say it can't happen soon enough.

"It's crucial for us to get more and more people coming out of the college levels with the knowledge that we're looking for," said Humiston.

Credits

WNYT Staff

Copyright 2018 - WNYT-TV, LLC A Hubbard Broadcasting Company

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