Doctor explains what's next after FDA pauses J&J vaccine

Syringes loaded with shots of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine in the pharmacy of National Jewish Hospital for distribution early Saturday, March 6, 2021, in east Denver. Syringes loaded with shots of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine in the pharmacy of National Jewish Hospital for distribution early Saturday, March 6, 2021, in east Denver. | Photo: AP Photo / David Zalubowski.

Benita Zahn
Updated: April 13, 2021 06:23 PM
Created: April 13, 2021 05:56 PM

The FDA says the pause administering the Johnson and Johnson vaccine will last a matter of days, as it tries to figure out why six women between the ages of 18 and 49 developed blood clots after getting the shot. One person died.

Unlike the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines which are RNA messenger based, the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, like the AstraZeneca vaccine, relies on an adenovirus to deliver DNA information your body can use to make antibodies to coronavirus.

They've also been used in gene therapy, so scientists had a clear sense of how to use them, and how our body responds to them.

The pause can help researchers determine if it's the vaccine itself or an undetected, underlying health issue at the heart of the issue.

Learn more about what could happen next once the findings are out by watching the video of Benita Zahn's story.


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