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Quarantine fatigue may have you short tempered

Benita Zahn
Updated: May 11, 2020 07:17 PM
Created: May 11, 2020 07:07 PM

May is "Mental Health Awareness Month" and that's got professionals in the field talking about something many of us may be experiencing: quarantine fatigue.

From social distancing, wearing a mask, frustration over not being able to do the things we want to do - more of us are suffering depression, anxiety, even trauma response. Add to that loneliness. The end result is quarantine fatigue and the desire to get out.

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Dr. Julie Morison from HPA/LiveWell says try to stick to your normal routine as much as possible, get outside when you can, attend to self-care and recognize that others in your home or those you encounter when you do get out, are experiencing the same feelings.

Morison says we need to take a breath before, as she puts it, you get ready for a throwdown - and recognize that we're all trying to manage the best way possible.     

If you need some help, the state Office of Mental Health has a free and confidential emotional support line. Trained professionals will answer your calls. The number is 1-844-863-9314.

MORE INFORMATION and Dr. Morison’s full interview: Health Beat: Quarantine fatigue


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