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Barr: Not enough evidence of Trump obstruction

President Donald Trump gestures to people cheering on the tarmac as he arrives on Air Force One at Palm Beach International Airport, in West Palm Beach, Fla., Friday, March 8, 2019, en route to Mar-a-lago in Palm Beach, Fla. President Donald Trump gestures to people cheering on the tarmac as he arrives on Air Force One at Palm Beach International Airport, in West Palm Beach, Fla., Friday, March 8, 2019, en route to Mar-a-lago in Palm Beach, Fla. | Photo: AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster.

March 24, 2019 04:36 PM

WASHINGTON (AP) - Evidence gathered in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation "is not sufficient to establish" that President Donald Trump committed obstruction of justice.

That's according to Attorney General William Barr in a letter to Congress summarizing the finding of the Mueller probe.

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Barr says Mueller did not reach any conclusions in evaluating the president's conduct, leaving it to the Justice Department.

Barr says he and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein reached the conclusion without considering constitutional questions regarding bringing criminal charges against a sitting president.

The summary also says Mueller did not find that the Trump campaign or its associates "conspired or coordinated" with Russia in its efforts to influence the 2016 election.

Special counsel Robert Mueller's team issued more than 2,800 subpoenas and executed nearly 500 search warrants in its probe of Russian interference in the 2016 election and any potential involvement by President Donald Trump's campaign.

That's according to Attorney General William Barr's letter to Congress on Sunday summarizing the findings. The special counsel employed 19 lawyers and was assisted by a team of 40 FBI agents, intelligence analysts, forensic accountants and other professional staff. The team interviewed approximately 500 witnesses.

The House Judiciary Committee chairman says special counsel Robert Mueller "clearly and explicitly is not exonerating the president."

Democratic Rep. Jerry Nadler tweeted that Attorney General William Barr's letter to Congress says that while President Donald Trump may have acted to obstruct justice, the government would need to prove that "beyond a reasonable doubt."

But Nadler tweeted Congress must hear from Barr about his decision making and see "all the underlying evidence for the American people to know all the facts."

Credits

AP

Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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